Agile Estimation

Agile estimation is a method of estimating the effort required to complete a user story. Agile estimation techniques are typically based on relative estimation, rather than trying to estimate the exact number of hours or days that a task will take.

Agile Estimation

How to estimate work: epics, stories, tickets, tasks

The most important part of estimating agile work is to break it down into small enough tasks that you can reasonably estimate the time it will take to complete. Start by estimating the time it will take to complete the epic or story, and then break that down into smaller tasks that can be completed in a single iteration. You can then estimate the time it will take to complete each task, and add up the total to get an estimate for the epic or story. Finally, you can add up all the estimates for all the epics and stories in a release to get an overall estimate for the release.

Estimate and promises

When estimating work, it is important to keep in mind that estimates are just that – estimates. They are not promises, and they should not be treated as such. The goal of estimation is to give the product owner and stakeholders a general idea of how much work is involved in a particular piece of functionality, so that they can make informed decisions about what to include in a release.

Is agile estimation a science?

Keep in mind that agile estimation is not an exact science, and that the goal is to get a general idea of how much work is involved, rather than to create a detailed schedule. As such, it is often best to use relative estimation methods, such as planning poker, rather than trying to estimate the exact number of hours or days that a task will take.

Let’s look at the some “agile basics”

What is a scrum team?

A scrum team is a self-organizing and cross-functional team that is responsible for delivering a product increment. The team consists of a product owner, a scrum master, and developers.

What is sprint planning?

Sprint planning is a meeting that is held at the beginning of each sprint to plan the work that will be done during the sprint. The product owner and developers discuss the user stories that need to be delivered, and the developers estimate how much work they can do during the sprint.

What is a product backlog?

The product backlog is a list of all the user stories that need to be delivered, ordered by priority. The product owner is responsible for maintaining the product backlog.

What is a user story?

A user story is a description of a piece of functionality that is to be delivered. User stories are typically written in the following format: “As a <type of user>, I want <feature> so that <benefit>.”

What is a sprint?

A sprint is a fixed-length iteration, typically two weeks long, during which a scrum team delivers a product increment.

What is a product increment?

A product increment is a deliverable that adds value to the product. A product increment must be complete, usable, and usable by the customer.

What is agile estimation?

Agile estimation is a method of estimating the effort required to complete a user story. Agile estimation techniques are typically based on relative estimation, rather than trying to estimate the exact number of hours or days that a task will take.

Agile Estimation

Agile estimation techniques are methods for estimating the effort required to complete a user story. Planning poker is one popular agile estimation technique.

User stories can be estimated using various agile estimation techniques, such as planning poker. To estimate a user story, the developers discuss the story and come to a consensus on how much work it will take to complete.

Planning poker is a agile estimation technique in which developers discuss a user story and come to a consensus on how much work it will take to complete.

Relative estimation is a method of estimating the effort required to complete a task by comparing it to other tasks of known size. Relative estimation is typically used in agile estimation techniques

The goal of agile estimation is to get a general idea of how much work is involved in a particular piece of functionality, so that the product owner and stakeholders can make informed decisions about what to include in a release. As such, it is often best to use relative estimation methods, such as planning poker, rather than trying to estimate the exact number of hours or days that a task will take.

Epics, Stories, Tickets and Tasks

Work Breakdown

The first thing to understand is the difference between an epic, a story, a ticket and a task. An epic is a high-level user story that will take more than one sprint to implement. A story is a smaller user story that can be implemented in a single sprint. A ticket is a unit of work that can be completed in a single day. And a task is a smaller unit of work that is used to break down a story or ticket.

Estimating Epics

The first step in agile estimation is to estimate the time it will take to complete an epic. This can be done using planning poker, or by simply asking the team how long they think it will take. Once an epic has been estimated, it can be broken down into smaller stories that can be implemented in a single sprint.

Estimating Stories

Stories can be estimated using planning poker, or by asking the team how long they think it will take to complete the story. Once a story has been estimated, it can be broken down into smaller tickets that can be completed in a single day.

Estimating Tickets

Tickets can be estimated using planning poker, or by asking the team how long they think it will take to complete the ticket. Once a ticket has been estimated, it can be broken down into smaller tasks that can be completed in a few hours.

Estimating Tasks

Tasks can be estimated using planning poker, or by asking the team how long they think it will take to complete the task. Once a task has been estimated, it can be added to the story or ticket it is part of.